top of page

Discover how integrating mental health training into workplace safety programs in Ontario can prioritize employee well-being. Learn more.

Workplace

Integrating Mental Health Training into Workplace Safety Programs in Ontario: Prioritizing Employee Well-being

0

3

Discover how Kore Training's First Aid and CPR training can benefit Ontario educators with essential emergency response skills.

Workplace

Essential Emergency Response Skills for Ontario Teachers and Educators: How First Aid and CPR Training Can Make a Difference

0

6

Discover how Ontario healthcare facilities can navigate safety regulations effectively to create safer environments for all occupants.

Workplace

Mastering Safety Compliance: A Guide for Healthcare Facilities and Businesses in Ontario

0

6

Health and Safety training enhances patient care and safety. Elevate your healthcare with comprehensive courses that exceed requirements.

Workplace

Strengthening Healthcare: Health and Safety Training Solutions for Ontario's Healthcare Industry

0

82

Discover why WSIB First Aid kits are non-negotiable for workplace safety including mandatory contents and size considerations for your biz

Workplace

Ensuring Workplace Safety: The Importance of WSIB First Aid Kits

0

21

Are you prioritizing workplace health and safety compliance in your Ontario business? Not sure? We've got a webinar you should attend.

Workplace

Safeguarding Your Business: The Importance of Workplace Health and Safety Compliance in Ontario

0

22

Related Post

WHMIS Safety Standards Evolution: Canada's Pioneering Role in Global Workplace Safety

Updated: Oct 17, 2023

Canada has always been a front-runner in implementing workplace safety measures, ensuring its workforce remains protected from various hazards. This commitment can be seen in its adoption of international standards and continuous research to assess the effectiveness of WHMIS safety standards.


Image of employee working with chemicals wearing the appropriate PPE to ensure the worker and other employees are safe
WHIMIS Safety Training

WHMIS and Global Chemical Safety

The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information (WHMIS), Canada's national hazard communication system, has transformed significantly. Established in 1988, WHMIS was updated in 2015 to align with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS), an initiative by the United Nations to enhance chemical safety worldwide. This harmonization ensures consistent communication of chemical hazards, making it easier for workers and employers globally.


An essential distinction in the WHMIS system is between education and training. While education provides generic knowledge about WHMIS, including hazard awareness and pictogram recognition, training dives deeper. It focuses on the chemicals workers might encounter, guiding them on safe storage, handling, usage, and disposal.


However, a concern is that many workplaces tend to stop at the education level, sidelining the crucial training component. Wes Mazur, a Health & Safety Professional, emphasizes the need for both, particularly for workers handling hazardous products. He also encourages employers to consider refresher courses, possibly every three years, to ensure their employees remain informed.


Another focal point is the Safety Data Sheets (SDSs). The transition from the older WHMIS version to the updated one has seen a need for suppliers to align their SDSs accordingly. These sheets are essential for workers to understand the hazards associated with various products.


The Impact of Working at Heights Training in Ontario

Safety extends beyond chemicals. A notable change in workplace safety in Ontario revolves around training for those working at heights. A study by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) reveals a significant decline in fall-related injuries among construction workers since mandatory and standardized height training was introduced in 2015. This standard mandates employers to ensure their workers undergo approved training every three years.


What's remarkable about this standard isn't just its existence and impact. Dr. Linda Robson, an IWH scientist, found that 90% of participants believed their workplace became safer post-training. Data from the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) echoes this sentiment, recording a 19% decrease in lost time injury claims related to falls between 2017 and 2019.


When matched against other Canadian jurisdictions, which showed a mere 6% decline in the same timeframe, it's evident that Ontario's proactive approach has been immensely effective.

However, no safety measure is without its critics. While many laud the standards, some question the necessity for refresher courses. Research favours periodic refreshers, especially since a survey found that 80% of initial training participants felt a refresher after three years would benefit their safety.


The importance of WHMIS

Both chemical and height safety are integral components of workplace safety in Canada. With the adoption of global standards and rigorous training protocols, Canada showcases its dedication to ensuring its workforce remains protected. As we progress, the emphasis should remain on regular reviews of these standards and consistent training and refreshers to ensure every worker returns home safely at the end of the day.

Comments


WHMIS Safety Standards Evolution: Canada's Pioneering Role in Global Workplace Safety

Workplace

Canada has always been a front-runner in implementing workplace safety measures, ensuring its workforce remains protected from various hazards. This commitment can be seen in its adoption of international standards and continuous research to assess the effectiveness of WHMIS safety standards.


Image of employee working with chemicals wearing the appropriate PPE to ensure the worker and other employees are safe
WHIMIS Safety Training

WHMIS and Global Chemical Safety

The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information (WHMIS), Canada's national hazard communication system, has transformed significantly. Established in 1988, WHMIS was updated in 2015 to align with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS), an initiative by the United Nations to enhance chemical safety worldwide. This harmonization ensures consistent communication of chemical hazards, making it easier for workers and employers globally.


An essential distinction in the WHMIS system is between education and training. While education provides generic knowledge about WHMIS, including hazard awareness and pictogram recognition, training dives deeper. It focuses on the chemicals workers might encounter, guiding them on safe storage, handling, usage, and disposal.


However, a concern is that many workplaces tend to stop at the education level, sidelining the crucial training component. Wes Mazur, a Health & Safety Professional, emphasizes the need for both, particularly for workers handling hazardous products. He also encourages employers to consider refresher courses, possibly every three years, to ensure their employees remain informed.


Another focal point is the Safety Data Sheets (SDSs). The transition from the older WHMIS version to the updated one has seen a need for suppliers to align their SDSs accordingly. These sheets are essential for workers to understand the hazards associated with various products.


The Impact of Working at Heights Training in Ontario

Safety extends beyond chemicals. A notable change in workplace safety in Ontario revolves around training for those working at heights. A study by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) reveals a significant decline in fall-related injuries among construction workers since mandatory and standardized height training was introduced in 2015. This standard mandates employers to ensure their workers undergo approved training every three years.


What's remarkable about this standard isn't just its existence and impact. Dr. Linda Robson, an IWH scientist, found that 90% of participants believed their workplace became safer post-training. Data from the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) echoes this sentiment, recording a 19% decrease in lost time injury claims related to falls between 2017 and 2019.


When matched against other Canadian jurisdictions, which showed a mere 6% decline in the same timeframe, it's evident that Ontario's proactive approach has been immensely effective.

However, no safety measure is without its critics. While many laud the standards, some question the necessity for refresher courses. Research favours periodic refreshers, especially since a survey found that 80% of initial training participants felt a refresher after three years would benefit their safety.


The importance of WHMIS

Both chemical and height safety are integral components of workplace safety in Canada. With the adoption of global standards and rigorous training protocols, Canada showcases its dedication to ensuring its workforce remains protected. As we progress, the emphasis should remain on regular reviews of these standards and consistent training and refreshers to ensure every worker returns home safely at the end of the day.

bottom of page